An Eganville man has been charged in connection with an incident earlier this week in which a crash left one woman dead.

 

Back on Monday afternoon, Renfrew OPP responded to a call about a stolen vehicle.

 

That same vehicle was later involved in a collision in Renfrew and left the scene.

 

Police later saw the vehicle on Highway 17 in the area of Calabogie Road – shortly after that the vehicle was involved in a collision on Daniel Street in Arnprior.

 

65 year old Sheila Walsh died at the scene.

 

20-year old Zachary Wittke has been charged with dangerous operation of a dangerous vehicle, theft of a motor vehicle, driving while disqualified and flight from police.

 

He is set to appear in court on Friday.

 

The SIU has been called in to investigate.

 

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Premier Kathleen Wynne says economists differ in their analysis of Ontario’s plan to hike the minimum wage to 15 dollars an hour.

 

She was responding to questions about a new report from TD Bank that says the plan will cost the province’s economy up to 90-thousand jobs by 2020.

 

The government says it will phase in the increase gradually, going from $11.40 to $11.60 next month, then to 14 dollars an hour on January 1st and 15 dollars the following year.

 

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The Ontario Human Rights Commission is calling on the provincial government to ban the use of segregation in its jails for people with mental illness, except in exceptional circumstances.

 

It has filed an application with the human rights tribunal of Ontario, alleging the government breached a 2013 settlement that required it to implement major segregation reforms

 

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Three days in November have been set aside for anyone who has thoughts on the Salvation Army plan for Montreal Road.

 

Ottawa’s planning committee has the 14th, 15th and 17th of November for public consultation on the plan.

 

It is expected a large number of people will want to have their say, so the planning committee will meet in council chambers instead of the usual committee room.

 

The Sally Ann wants to close its George Street centre, sell that land, and house a new facility on Montreal Road.

 

The proposal is for a 350 bed facility at a cost of 50 million dollars.

 

Councillors on that committee will also see a report on the proposal from groups including public health.

 

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The Canadian Armed Forces will bid farewell to the Commander in Chief today.

 

The military send off for David Johnston will be held at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum this morning at ten.

 

There will be an honour guard of 100, a fly past of CF-18’s as well as a 21 gun salute.

 

Then, for the final time as Commander in Chief, Johnston will inspect the guard of honour.

 

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A man who crashed his vehicle into a school bus northwest of Kingston has been banned from driving for one year and handed a 25-hundred dollar fine.

 

Forty-four-year-old Michael MacLellan pleaded guilty to driving with more than 80 milligrams of alcohol in 100 millilitres of blood in connection with the July 25th crash near Bon Echo Provincial Park.

 

Court heard a pickup truck collided with the bus, which was taking some children to swimming lessons.

 

No one on the bus was hurt, but MacLellan sustained minor injuries.

 

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Three U-S politicians say Ontario should deal directly with local and state leaders as President Donald Trump continues to take a protectionist tone during NAFTA talks.

 

The governors of Virginia and Maryland and the mayor of Washington, D-C met with Premier Kathleen Wynne at the legislature yesterday as part of their trade mission to Ontario.

 

Wynne says discussions centred on the auto sector, tourism and the uncertainty surrounding the NAFTA talks.

 

Trump has suggested that NAFTA be terminated and has tweeted that both Canada and Mexico are being “very difficult.”

 

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Bombardier’s hopes for breaking into the U-S market have taken a massive blow, after the Trump administration ruled in favour of the Montreal-based company’s American rival.

 

In a preliminary decision, the U-S Commerce Department has slapped a massive duty on Bombardier’s sale of C-Series jets to Delta Airlines.

 

The ruling comes after Boeing complained that Bombardier benefited from unfair government subsidies.

 

Delta, Bombardier and the Canadian government have all blasted the decision.

 

So has British Prime Minister Theresa May, who says she’s “bitterly disappointed.”

 

Bombardier employs more than four-thousand people in Northern Island.

 

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The third of seven planned rounds of negotiations for a new North American Free Trade Agreement wraps up in Ottawa today.

 

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland, who heads Canada’s NAFTA re-negotiating team, will host her American and Mexican counterparts for a series of meetings.

 

But with the major issues expected to be pushed forward into a fourth round in the coming weeks, the prospect of finishing by the end of the year is becoming more unlikely.

 

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The U-S has sworn in its next ambassador to Canada at a moment of trade tensions between the two countries.

 

Kelly Knight Craft was sworn in yesterday by Vice-President Mike Pence at the White House on.

 

The philanthropist and Republican donor takes over the role as NAFTA negotiations continue between Canada, the U-S and Mexico.

 

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After not mentioning hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico for days, U-S President Donald Trump can suddenly talk about little else.

 

On Tuesday, Trump pushed back against criticism that he failed to quickly grasp the magnitude of Maria’s destruction.

 

He announced he would visit the territory, as well as the U-S Virgin Islands, next week.

 

Trump also tweeted about Puerto Rico’s needs, and talked about the island during a meeting on tax cuts and a news conference with Spain’s prime minister.

 

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A town in Alberta hopes to pull a different kind of energy from the abandoned oil and gas wells that surround it.

 

Hinton is teaming up with researchers and the private sector to install what could be Canada’s first geothermal heating system in its downtown core.

 

The town and a Calgary-based company hope to re-open an abandoned well and use heat from the bottom to warm municipal buildings.

 

If everything goes well, the pilot project will be underway by 2019.

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